Tech

Robinhood Reveals Hackers Stole Thousands of Phone Numbers

Robinhood Reveals Hackers Stole Thousands of Phone Numbers

More than a week after the popular investment and trading platform Robinhood reported that hackers had accessed a “small amount” of its clients’ personal information, the business has now revealed that thousands of phone numbers were among the stolen data.

The list stolen by the hackers, which included email addresses for nearly five million people and full names for another set of about two million, had “several thousand entries” with phone numbers, according to Robinhood. Even though the corporation did not say how many phone numbers were on the list, Motherboard estimated it to be around 4,400.

“From a source who offered themselves as a proxy for the hackers,” Motherboard obtained a copy of the stolen phone numbers. Robinhood did not confirm whether the phone numbers received by Motherboard were genuine in a response to the site, but did concede that the stolen material included thousands of phone numbers.

It also stated that it was looking into other “text entries” in the list, which probably refers to customer information.

In a blog update, Robinhood noted, “[T]he list also contains other text entries that we’re continuing to evaluate.” “We are confident that the list did not contain Social Security numbers, bank account numbers, or debit card information, and that no customers have suffered financial loss as a result of the event.” We’ll continue to make proper disclosures to those who are affected.”

On Wednesday, Gizmodo contacted Robinhood to see if it had any updates on whether hackers had gotten their hands on critical personal information, and was directed to the company’s blog, which we reproduced above.

The Robinhood hack occurred on November 3 and was carried out through a social engineering scheme. The hackers conned a customer service representative over the phone into believing they had permission to access “certain customer support systems.” The hackers gained access to around five million consumer email addresses and two million full names as a result of this.

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On Wednesday, Gizmodo contacted Robinhood to see if it had any updates on whether hackers had gotten their hands on critical personal information, and was directed to the company’s blog, which we reproduced above.

The Robinhood hack occurred on November 3 and was carried out through a social engineering scheme. The hackers conned a customer service representative over the phone into believing they had permission to access “certain customer support systems.” The hackers gained access to around five million consumer email addresses and two million full names as a result of this.

At the time, the corporation also stated that the hackers had gotten information on 310 people, including their name, date of birth, and zip code. More “extensive” account details were exposed for about ten clients, though the company did not specify what information was included under “extensive.”

The hackers requested an extortion payment after collecting consumer data. Following that, Robinhood contacted authorities and hired the security firm Mandiant to assist in the investigation.

Running away with stolen email addresses and names was already concerning, as thieves could use them to gain even more information about you and endanger your accounts. Phone numbers, on the other hand, are especially dangerous to lose, as Motherboard correctly points out, because hackers can use them to fool your phone’s multi-factor authentication or send phishing messages from your device.

All of this serves as a gentle reminder to switch off our phones, store them in a box, and never use the internet again. Is it, however, going to happen?

The Author

Samuel Adeshina

Samuel is a financial reporter whose interests include blockchain, market, business, insurance, and Crypto to provide relevant information to all interested.